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Items tagged with: amateurradio

Modifications, hints, tips and technical information for the AnyTone 868 and 878, and BTech DMR-6X2 amateur radios


One of the most comprehensive hints and tips sites I've seen covering these radios. Lots of useful tips but also info on compatibility of chargers and batteries, and even how to convert an Anytone AT-D878UV to a Plus model with an aftermarket Bluetooth module. It is written from the perspective of being outside the USA so could be useful for international amateurs using these radios.

Needless to say note the cautions as some of these hacks could seriously damage your radio or put you in contravention of your local laws.

See http://members.optuszoo.com.au/jason.reilly1/868mods.htm

#amateurradio #hamradio #anyto... Show more...
 

Amateur Radio Digital Open Protocol (ARDOP) - A newer open radio protocol for Winlink users for transmission of e-mails during disasters or by mariners


A newer open radio protocol for Winlink users, and for amateurs everywhere is available already. ARDOP (Amateur Radio Digital Open Protocol) is a new (from 2018) cooperative radio protocol project in which the Amateur Radio Safety Foundation and Rick Muething, KN6KB, of the Winlink Development Team are proud to have a major role. ARDOP will ultimately replace WINMOR in the Winlink system because of its superior features and multiple platform (OS) support.

The protocol design is open, and the software implementations will be open-sourced. This means you can expect the protocol to take different forms, like a virtual TNC using sound-card software on Windows, Linux, Apple OS X, iOS, and Android, or in hardware, like a USB plug-in or 'add-on box' using today's low-cost DSP CPU chips.

This is an important step as one of the most efficient protocols has been the proprietary Pactor 2 and above, but modems cost easil... Show more...
 
Yes, ARDOP does work, often more robust than VARA. I've used them both, in addition to VARA FM.
Of course, VARA FM is used for VHF/UHF FM transmissions. The throughput for VARA FM can be quite impressive!
#winlink #amateurradio #hamradio
 

Winlink 2000 - a worldwide system for sending and receiving e-mail over radio without the Internet


Since this system does not rely on the Internet it is widely used by mariners, RV campers, missionaries, and various agencies who need to communicate when the Internet is not available at the last mile location.

The Winlink system consists of a group of Common Message Servers (CMS) placed at various locations around the world. These servers connect via the Internet to Radio Message Servers (RMS) in many geographic locations to form a star network configuration. The Radio Message Servers are the UHF, VHF, or HF RF gateways into the Winlink system. The final component on either side is a client computer device running the software to send/receive messages through your radio. In Internet terms you could think of the Radio as a modem (very loosely speaking).

The client computer will generally run Winlink Express if it's a Windows computer, or AirMail if a MacOS (Airmail can also run under WINE or CrossOver on Linux). Yes Pat and Paclink will run on Linux but it is... Show more...
 

A default Raspberry Pi with RPITX software and a short wire antenna can transmit AM, FM, SSB 5 KHz up to 1500 MHz


True it is only transmitting a few mW but it genuinely does these transmission modes at these frequencies with only a piece of wire connected to one of the pins on the board - no extra hardware modules added. Who said Raspberry Pi's are not amazing!

This is quite a useful way to demonstrate how RF transmitting works to youngsters. Of course, its got to be remembered that without a bandpass filter this is going to generate some interference and apart from that transmission is regulated in most countries.

Watch a short video of how it works at and the source code can be found at https://github.com/F5OEO/rpitx

#RPITX #raspberrypi #amateurradio



US: https://www.amazon.com/shop/techminds UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/shop/techminds Here we take a look at RPITX Version 2 which has a nice and easy to use...

https://gadgeteer.co.za/node/3547
 

DIY Dipole Antenna just installed but needs to be shortened slightly


Built the dipole antenna from some plain copper wire, two insulators and an MFJ-913 4:1 balun. I mounted it on my existing pole with a short run of RG-58 coax down to the shack. Its resonance though is around 1 MHz below what it needs to be so when the weather is better I'll trim the wires a little shorter and re-measure. I'll probably have it at around 2.5:1 SWR. Looks like 40m and 15m will be its best bands but let's see after it is trimmed. I have an ATU to match the impedance.

#hamradio #amateurradio #dipole #antenna

... Show more...
 

City of Newport asks residents to get radio-ready in event of cellphone outage because convenience does not trump disasters


Hurricane season began June 1st and with residents increasingly reliant on cellular and WiFi networks, Newport’s Emergency Management Team wants to find out just how prepared Newport is to withstand a widespread communications outage by asking the question: What happens when the cell towers go down?

The exercise is part of the City’s ongoing emergency management training and aims to engage directly with the community to simulate what could one day become a real-world scenario.

Playing a central role in the effort will be the volunteer members of the Newport County Radio Club, which since 1945 has been educating the community and training “ham” radio operators throughout Newport County.

During the exercise on June 29 from noon to 2 p.m., radio operators from the Newport County Radio Club will staff a 2-meter VHF station at Firehouse 1, where incoming transmissions from across the City will be received from... Show more...
 

My new FAA-450 Antenna Analyzer (EU1KY)


The FAA-450 Antenna Analyzer is an open source project built from STM32-F7 Discovery board. This project originated from “EU1KY Antenna Analyzer V3”, which features a colour TFT LCD, Capacitive Touchscreen, HF/VHF(UHF) frequency coverage, built-in TDR function, and multiple scanning curves besides with SWR. These features may outperform many expensive antenna analyzers present on the market. The analyzer utilizes the DSP technology to analyze the sampled and lower converted (10KHz) V & I signal and derive their magnitude ratio and phase difference. The calibrated measured results could be very accurate for amateur radio purpose.

Moreover, the device is able to work up to 450 MHz for some less accurate measurements.(Using 3rd harmonics of both signal and LO above 150 MHz, or above 200 MHz if properly confgured).

I bought it ready assembled from https://www.elekitsorparts.com/product/faa-450-antenna-analyzer-eu1ky

#antennaanalyser #EU1KY #amateurradio



https://gadgeteer.co.za/node/3295
FAA-450 Antenna Analyzer (EU1KY)
 

New TYT TH-7800 radio and Comet SBB1 Antenna installed in my car in under an hour


I thought I'd see how far I could get between getting home from work and sunset as I knew getting a power cable through the car's firewall was going to be a major challenge especially in my hybrid when everything is packed in so tight in the engine compartment.

I used up half my time mounting the antenna which was an easy job (although I must still tidy the final bits) and I started to poke around blindly behind the engine until I thought I better find my battery first and see which side of the engine it is on...then I remembered it was not in the front but actually under the rear seat. This could not have been better as I spent most of the time trying to find a spanner to fit the battery terminal nut. The actual hookup was very quick and all the cables fit without any extensions at all.

The radio sits under the seat in a box, and its faceplate mounts on a RAM mount which sits securely in the cup holder. Zero holes drilled anywhere.

So the radio is in and working. I just... Show more...
 

My new TYT TH-7800 dual band mobile transceiver arrived today with a Comet SBB1 antenna and universal lip mount


This is what arrived today:
1. TYT TH-7800 dual band mobile transceiver with detachable faceplate
2. RAM cup holder mount (will hold the radio faceplate)
3. 100W dummy load (for my base rig)
4. Comet SBB1 VHF/UHF antenna
5. Comet LD-5M universal lip mount for the antenna on the car
6. Minus one programming cable for the radio - now ordered as I got misled by a reviewer who said it was included.

Next challenge is to get the power wire through the car's firewall to connect to the battery (full power transmit is too heavy for all the stuff I already have connected off the cigarette lighter plug). Busy evenings ahead...

#amateurradio #hamradio #TYT

... Show more...
 

High frequency (HF) radio essential in an emergency: amateur operators


If disaster strikes in the US northwest, amateur radio operators like Woody Linton are ready to spring into action.

During disasters, communication lines are the first thing to break down, Linton said — bad news for emergency responders. That’s why a new high-frequency radio station recently installed at the City of Kenora Fire Station One’s emergency operations centre is so vital, Linton said.

Linton is a member of the Amateur Radio Emergency Service, a Canadian and American corps of volunteer amateur radio operators who assist in emergency communications during times of disaster.

“When things go amuck, the essential services — police, fire, ambulance, social services — quite often are overwhelmed with what they have to do,” Linton said in the lobby of the City of Kenora Fire and Emergency Operations Centre. “Quite often, regular landlines are overloaded, and our cell service goes down because it can’t take the stress — i... Show more...
 

High frequency (HF) radio essential in an emergency: amateur operators


If disaster strikes in the US northwest, amateur radio operators like Woody Linton are ready to spring into action.

During disasters, communication lines are the first thing to break down, Linton said — bad news for emergency responders. That’s why a new high-frequency radio station recently installed at the City of Kenora Fire Station One’s emergency operations centre is so vital, Linton said.

Linton is a member of the Amateur Radio Emergency Service, a Canadian and American corps of volunteer amateur radio operators who assist in emergency communications during times of disaster.

“When things go amuck, the essential services — police, fire, ambulance, social services — quite often are overwhelmed with what they have to do,” Linton said in the lobby of the City of Kenora Fire and Emergency Operations Centre. “Quite often, regular landlines are overloaded, and our cell service goes down because it can’t take the stress — i... Show more...
 

Passed my Class A Amateur Radio Exam and now have Callsign ZS1OSS


Finally after 4 months of weekly evening classes where we delved deep into technical electronics and RF theory including how RF filters work, radio interference, antenna performance, safety, RF propagation, amplifiers, legal regulations and band plans I wrote the exam this last Saturday and the results came out today as a pass and my callsign was issued. The actual certificate from ICASA may take a bit longer as their printing is not immediate. This certificate is needed to register on digital services such as Echolink and DMR services.

Something we do in South Africa which is not done everywhere is the need to obtain an HF assessment certificate. So we had to demonstrate setting up a radio and antenna, checking SWR and making 5 different on-air contacts on the HF bands (shortwave between 3 Mhz to 30 MHz). The real highlight for me was making contact with a station in the Northen Cape about 800km North of Cape Town just using radio. Next, I suppose I need to aim for bouncing signals off the moon and... Show more...
 

Passed my Class A Amateur Radio Exam and now have Callsign ZS1OSS


Finally after 4 months of weekly evening classes where we delved deep into technical electronics and RF theory including how RF filters work, radio interference, antenna performance, safety, RF propagation, amplifiers, legal regulations and band plans I wrote the exam this last Saturday and the results came out today as a pass and my callsign was issued. The actual certificate from ICASA may take a bit longer as their printing is not immediate. This certificate is needed to register on digital services such as Echolink and DMR services.

Something we do in South Africa which is not done everywhere is the need to obtain an HF assessment certificate. So we had to demonstrate setting up a radio and antenna, checking SWR and making 5 different on-air contacts on the HF bands (shortwave between 3 Mhz to 30 MHz). The real highlight for me was making contact with a station in the Northen Cape about 800km North of Cape Town just using radio. Next, I suppose I need to aim for bouncing signals off the moon and... Show more...
 

The MB1 SDR HF/6M/VHF Ham Radio Transceiver runs Windows10 - Roll on Vulnerantibilities, Forced Reboots after Updates, End of Support, and Blue Screen of Death for Ham Radio now?


It's nice that you don't need a computer plus a radio, and I know ham radio breaks new ground with new technology and modes, but you invest a lot in a good radio and I'm just wondering if this is not taking things too far along a road not known for its rock-solid stability as GUI computer OSs tend to run out of support after a few years, need regular security patching, etc. Will be interesting to see how this is running in 10 years time.

That said my own Yaeasu FT-991A is anyway running its own form of built-in SDR and yes as it is purpose-built firmware it does not have an array of buttons all ready to click with a mouse as I have to punch a few buttons or sometimes manage it from a connected computer (I like three separate screen and hate Alt-Tabbing through screens one behind each other). But its not exposed directly to the Internet and has no multitasking OS running other applications.... Show more...
 

High frequency (HF) radio "essential" in an emergency: amateur operators


If disaster strikes in the US northwest, amateur radio operators like Woody Linton are ready to spring into action.

During disasters, communication lines are the first thing to break down, Linton said — bad news for emergency responders. That’s why a new high-frequency radio station recently installed at the City of Kenora Fire Station One’s emergency operations centre is so vital, Linton said.

Linton is a member of the Amateur Radio Emergency Service, a Canadian and American corps of volunteer amateur radio operators who assist in emergency communications during times of disaster.

“When things go amuck, the essential services — police, fire, ambulance, social services — quite often are overwhelmed with what they have to do,” Linton said in the lobby of the City of Kenora Fire and Emergency Operations Centre. “Quite often, regular landlines are overloaded, and our cell service goes down because it can’t take the stress —... Show more...
 

NPR (New Packet Radio mode) - A new digital mode for radio amateurs


Despite what the article starts out saying, amateur radio has by no means stood still - it has progressed through AM, FM, SSB, RTTY, Wires, Echolink, DMR, bouncing signals off the moon, repeaters, relaying via orbiting satellites, Winlink, and way more. So just ignore that paragraph and move to the meat.

Guillaume, F4HDK has come up with NPR, or New Packet Radio mode, which is intended to bring high bandwidth IP networking to radio amateurs in the 70 cm band, and it does this rather cleverly with a modem that contains a single-chip FSK transceiver intended for use in licence-free ISM band applications. There is an Ethernet module and an Mbed microcontroller board on a custom PCB, which when assembled produces a few hundred milliwatts of RF that can be fed to an off-the-shelf DMR power amplifier.

Each network is configured around a master node intended to use an omnidirectional antenna, to which individual nodes connect. Time-division multiplexing is enforced by the master so there should be... Show more...
 

The role of amateur radio in providing emergency electronic communication for disaster management around the world


In the USA, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) provides support to State and local governments in fulfilment of their responsibilities for preparedness, response, recovery and mitigation of disasters. One method FEMA has used to support State and local emergency communication functions was to sign and implement a Memorandum of Understanding with the American Radio Relay League (ARRL) for amateur radio operators to provide electronic communications for State and local governments in disasters. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has licensed more than 600,000 amateur radio operators in the USA. The national organization of amateur radio operators called the American Radio Relay League (ARRL) was formed in 1914. More than 80,000 of these amateurs have registered their availability for emergency communications in disasters in the ARRL’s Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES). Amateur radio operators have been providing communications in... Show more...
 
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The role of amateur radio in providing emergency electronic communication for disaster management around the world

In the USA, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) provides support to State and local governments in fulfilment of their responsibilities for preparedness, response, recovery and mitigation of disasters. One method FEMA has used to support State and local emergency communication functions was to sign and implement a Memorandum of Understanding with the American Radio Relay League (ARRL) for amateur radio operators to provide electronic communications for State and local governments in disasters. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has licensed more than 600,000 amateur radio operators in the USA. The national organization of amateur radio operators called the American Radio Relay League (ARRL) was formed in 1914. More than 80,000 of these amateurs have registered their availability for emer... Show more...
 
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MFJ-993B Intellituner Automatic Antenna Tuner arrived this week

Too much reflective power coming back from a badly tuned antenna can not only in extreme cases cause damage to a transmitter but it is also an indicator of bad resonance which means power loss from the actual transmission.

This auto tuner cannot correct for actual resonance of the antenna (you have to, for example, adjust the antenna itself) but it does improve power transfer between the transmitter and the antenna by matching the specified load impedance of the radio to the combined input impedance of the feedline (the feedline is the coax cable between the transmitter and the antenna).

The device will also the SWR (amount of reflective power as a ratio), the power output in Watts from the transmitter, the frequency in MHz, and it has an L-Network display too showing inductance value and the capacitance value both on the antenna and the trans... Show more...
 
\https://plus.google.com/+DanievanderMerwe/posts/WeUr4DXgb2g

MFJ-993B Intellituner Automatic Antenna Tuner arrived this week

Too much reflective power coming back from a badly tuned antenna can not only in extreme cases cause damage to a transmitter but it is also an indicator of bad resonance which means power loss from the actual transmission.

This auto tuner cannot correct for actual resonance of the antenna (you have to, for example, adjust the antenna itself) but it does improve power transfer between the transmitter and the antenna by matching the specified load impedance of the radio to the combined input impedance of the feedline (the feedline is the coax cable between the transmitter and the antenna).

The device will also the SWR (amount of reflective power as a ratio), the power output in Watts from the transmitter, the frequency in MHz, and it has an L-Network display too showing inductance value and the capacitance value both on the antenn... Show more...
 

Mounted my DIY VHF Antenna made from solid brass brazing rods


This is now replacing the previous one I had made out of 2mm copper wire as its vertical blew off in the gusting wind due to the solder joint not being very strong on the weak centre pin of the UHF panel mount connector.

The new one is using choc block connectors (the brass part) to screw on the vertical and radials onto the panel mount UHF connector. It sounds better but I'm still not happy with it as the choc block connectors cannot be screwed very tight (brass is a bit weak and the first one I screwed on just split) so I used a clear epoxy resin which I hope will prevent it working loose in the wind. The vertical was again a problem with that thin centre pin but I bout a small 4mm brass sleeve that I drilled the centre out with a Dremel to 3mm so it could fit tightly over the centre pin. Then the vertical brazing rod with its choc block connector fitted quite tightly over that sleeve, with more epoxy resin.

It's receiving quite well on my SDR right now but not tested it yet on my actual radio.... Show more...
 
Image/photo
Image/photo
Mounted my DIY VHF Antenna made from solid brass brazing rods

This is now replacing the previous one I had made out of 2mm copper wire as its vertical blew off in the gusting wind due to the solder joint not being very strong on the weak centre pin of the UHF panel mount connector.

The new one is using choc block connectors (the brass part) to screw on the vertical and radials onto the panel mount UHF connector. It sounds better but I'm still not happy with it as the choc block connectors cannot be screwed very tight (brass is a bit weak and the first one I screwed on just split) so I used a clear epoxy resin which I hope will prevent it working loose in the wind. The vertical was again a problem with that thin centre pin but I bout a small 4mm brass sleeve that I drilled... Show more...
 
\https://plus.google.com/+DanievanderMerwe/posts/CLQSJ4GB6oc

Mounted my DIY VHF Antenna made from solid brass brazing rods

This is now replacing the previous one I had made out of 2mm copper wire as its vertical blew off in the gusting wind due to the solder joint not being very strong on the weak centre pin of the UHF panel mount connector.

The new one is using choc block connectors (the brass part) to screw on the vertical and radials onto the panel mount UHF connector. It sounds better but I'm still not happy with it as the choc block connectors cannot be screwed very tight (brass is a bit weak and the first one I screwed on just split) so I used a clear epoxy resin which I hope will prevent it working loose in the wind. The vertical was again a problem with that thin centre pin but I bout a small 4mm brass sleeve that I drilled the centre out with a Dremel to 3mm so it could fit tightly over the centre pin. Then the vertical brazing rod with its choc blo... Show more...
 

Photos from our Amateur Radio HF Practical Assessment - Making Contact here with ZS3Y who was 750km away East of Uppington


The afternoon started with about 30 minutes to assemble and erect the inverted V antenna (for 40m and 80m bands) and after testing the SWR and switching the radio on, we each took turns to make contacts on the HF frequency bands. We each made two contacts so require another three before we can be signed off as having passed the practical assessment,

The furthest contact we made was with ZS3Y who was situated on a wine farm about 50km East of Uppington which was a good 750km away.

More photos and videos at https://photos.gadgeteer.co.za/index.php?/category/219

#amateurradio #hamradio #capetown
16/02/2019
 
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Photos from our Amateur Radio HF Practical Assessment - Making Contact here with ZS3Y who was 750km away East of Uppington

The afternoon started with about 30 minutes to assemble and erect the inverted V antenna (for 40m and 80m bands) and after testing the SWR and switching the radio on, we each took turns to make contacts on the HF frequency bands. We each made two contacts so require another three before we can be signed off as having passed the practical assessment,

The furthest contact we made was with ZS3Y who was situated on a wine farm about 50km East of Uppington which was a good 750km away.

More photos and videos at https://photos.gadgeteer.co.za/index.php?/category/219

#amateurradio #hamradio #capetown
 
\https://plus.google.com/+DanievanderMerwe/posts/WVwNW76ALsb

Photos from our Amateur Radio HF Practical Assessment - Making Contact here with ZS3Y who was 750km away East of Uppington

The afternoon started with about 30 minutes to assemble and erect the inverted V antenna (for 40m and 80m bands) and after testing the SWR and switching the radio on, we each took turns to make contacts on the HF frequency bands. We each made two contacts so require another three before we can be signed off as having passed the practical assessment,

The furthest contact we made was with ZS3Y who was situated on a wine farm about 50km East of Uppington which was a good 750km away.

More photos and videos at https://photos.gadgeteer.co.za/index.php?/category/219

\#amateurradio \#hamradio \#capetown

16/02/2019
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Image/photo Image/photo Image/photo
 

Automatic Packet Reporting System (APRS) is an amateur radio-based system for real-time digital communications of information of immediate value in the local area


Data can include object Global Positioning System (GPS) coordinates, weather station telemetry, text messages, announcements, queries, and other telemetry. APRS data can be displayed on a map, which can show stations, objects, tracks of moving objects, weather stations, search and rescue data, and direction finding data. APRS (Automatic Packet Reporting System), is a digital communications protocol for exchanging information among a large number of stations covering a large (local) area, often referred to as "IP-ers". As a multi-user data network, it is quite different from conventional packet radio. Rather than using connected data streams where stations connect to each other and packets are acknowledged and retransmitted if lost, APRS operates entirely in an unconnected broadcast fashion, using unnumbered AX.25 frames.

APRS packets are transmitted for all other stations to hear and use. Packet repeaters... Show more...
 
Automatic Packet Reporting System (APRS) is an amateur radio-based system for real-time digital communications of information of immediate value in the local area

Data can include object Global Positioning System (GPS) coordinates, weather station telemetry, text messages, announcements, queries, and other telemetry. APRS data can be displayed on a map, which can show stations, objects, tracks of moving objects, weather stations, search and rescue data, and direction finding data. APRS (Automatic Packet Reporting System), is a digital communications protocol for exchanging information among a large number of stations covering a large (local) area, often referred to as "IP-ers". As a multi-user data network, it is quite different from conventional packet radio. Rather than using connected data streams where stations connect to each other and packets are acknowledged and retransmitted if lost, APRS operates entirely in an unconnected broadcast fashion, using unnumbered AX.25 frames.

APRS packets are transmitted for all other stations to hear and use. Pack... Show more...
 
\https://plus.google.com/+DanievanderMerwe/posts/honwMPiz4K1

Automatic Packet Reporting System (APRS) is an amateur radio-based system for real-time digital communications of information of immediate value in the local area

Data can include object Global Positioning System (GPS) coordinates, weather station telemetry, text messages, announcements, queries, and other telemetry. APRS data can be displayed on a map, which can show stations, objects, tracks of moving objects, weather stations, search and rescue data, and direction finding data. APRS (Automatic Packet Reporting System), is a digital communications protocol for exchanging information among a large number of stations covering a large (local) area, often referred to as "IP-ers". As a multi-user data network, it is quite different from conventional packet radio. Rather than using connected data streams where stations connect to each other and packets are acknowledged and retransmitted if lost, APRS operates... Show more...
 
Hey everyone, I’m not exactly #newhere, because I've been lurking and commenting for a while, but I think it is time to get this first post done. I’m interested in #amateurradio, #arduino, #baking, #bikes, #chinese, #chocolate, #cooking, #electronics, #ev, #ghibli, #ham, #hamradio, #japan, #languages, #motorcycle, #nkust, #raspberrypi, #taiwan, #台灣, and #高科大. I am interested in a few more things, but I don't for example like to be notified multiple times that a new version X of Linux distribution Y is out, for me it's simply my standard OS to work with, not a toy.

I still need to refine the tags I'm following, but I guess those are fluid anyway. I will also need to experiment a bit with posting options, so apologies if the first posts are a little barebone. And I hope this will be fun...
 

My Amateur Radio Exams Study Guide


Finally started my amateur radio course this week so I can write the exam in May (SA only has two exams per year). This is my study guide printed in duplex. Two thirds of it is just over 300 pages on radio operating procedure and technical, with the remainder being our Regulations and HF setup procedure. I have to an HF operating practical before I write the theory exam in May.

#hamradio #amateurradio
 
Image/photo
My Amateur Radio Exams Study Guide

Finally started my amateur radio course this week so I can write the exam in May (SA only has two exams per year). This is my study guide printed in duplex. Two thirds of it is just over 300 pages on radio operating procedure and technical, with the remainder being our Regulations and HF setup procedure. I have to an HF operating practical before I write the theory exam in May.

#hamradio #amateurradio
 
\https://plus.google.com/+DanievanderMerwe/posts/ivkJQXfhPe5

My Amateur Radio Exams Study Guide

Finally started my amateur radio course this week so I can write the exam in May (SA only has two exams per year). This is my study guide printed in duplex. Two thirds of it is just over 300 pages on radio operating procedure and technical, with the remainder being our Regulations and HF setup procedure. I have to an HF operating practical before I write the theory exam in May.

\#hamradio \#amateurradio

 
\https://plus.google.com/+DanievanderMerwe/posts/R8xdjALosqK

The phone network is down and the internet is inaccessible... Beginner’s Guide to Amateur (Ham) Radio for Preppers/Survivalists

As seen in recent disasters, you simply cannot rely on mobile phones or the internet to communicate because of their dependency on the electrical and data grid.

FEMA and the Red Cross frequently rely on local Hams for spreading key info. After the devastating hurricanes of 2017, Ham radio operators in Puerto Rico sprung to action after Hurricane Maria knocked out the island’s communication, establishing crucial contact with rescue agencies.

You can think of countless situations where communication could make the difference between life and death on an individual level, too. What if disaster strikes when someone in your family is 10 miles away at work? Or you have a medical emergency while camping?

But the trucker-cliche CB and “toy” ve... Show more...
 

SharkRF openSPOT is a standalone digital radio IP gateway designed mainly for amateur radio to reach DMR, D-STAR and C4FM/System Fusion networks


As digital radio is becoming more popular with amateur radio enthusiasts there is one limitation that is becoming more obvious. Radios, Repeaters and digital radio standards do not talk to each other.

Radios such as Icom and Kenwood support the D-STAR digital standard whilst Yaesu only supports System Fusion (C4FM) and then there is also DMR itself which leans more towards commercial radio use. To make matters worse I may have say a Yaesu radio but my local repeater tower only supports D-STAR or no digital at all.

So what the openSPOT does is it acts as a local compatible repeater. So my Yaesu radio would see it as a System Fusion (C4FM) compatible repeater connected via local UHF signal, and the openSPOT is in turn connected to the Internet and will connect to supported digital networks all around the world. It has built-in WiFi so will get its Internet connection via home WFi, your mobile phone or an Internet cafe... Show more...
 
SharkRF openSPOT is a standalone digital radio IP gateway designed mainly for amateur radio to reach DMR, D-STAR and C4FM/System Fusion networks

As digital radio is becoming more popular with amateur radio enthusiasts there is one limitation that is becoming more obvious. Radios, Repeaters and digital radio standards do not talk to each other.

Radios such as Icom and Kenwood support the D-STAR digital standard whilst Yaesu only supports System Fusion (C4FM) and then there is also DMR itself which leans more towards commercial radio use. To make matters worse I may have say a Yaesu radio but my local repeater tower only supports D-STAR or no digital at all.

So what the openSPOT does is it acts as a local compatible repeater. So my Yaesu radio would see it as a System Fusion (C4FM) compatible repeater connected via local UHF signal, and the openSPOT is in turn connected to the Internet and will connect to supported digital networks all around the world. It has built-in WiFi so will get its Internet connection via home WFi, your mobile phone or an I... Show more...
 
\https://plus.google.com/+DanievanderMerwe/posts/T2JM8s8UpWf

SharkRF openSPOT is a standalone digital radio IP gateway designed mainly for amateur radio to reach DMR, D-STAR and C4FM/System Fusion networks

As digital radio is becoming more popular with amateur radio enthusiasts there is one limitation that is becoming more obvious. Radios, Repeaters and digital radio standards do not talk to each other.

Radios such as Icom and Kenwood support the D-STAR digital standard whilst Yaesu only supports System Fusion (C4FM) and then there is also DMR itself which leans more towards commercial radio use. To make matters worse I may have say a Yaesu radio but my local repeater tower only supports D-STAR or no digital at all.

So what the openSPOT does is it acts as a local compatible repeater. So my Yaesu radio would see it as a System Fusion (C4FM) compatible repeater connected via local UHF signal, and the openSPOT is in turn connected to the Internet and wil... Show more...
 

Yaesu FT-65R Product Review - Replaces the 14 Year Old Venerable FT-60R


The Yaesu FT-60R is a very well respected and dependable low-priced handheld transceiver. I especially like its 500mW minimum power that can be used on walkie-talkie channels, and its dual watch capability (to monitor a priority channel).

The new model still retains the above features but has a brighter clearer display, better menus view with new groupings, and a much better 1950mAh Li-ion battery. It's also gained a flashlight but I'm not sure that is anything to shout about. It seems to have lost the Rx range of 108 MHz to 136 MHz but it has gained 65 MHz to 108 MHz which is FM Broadcast reception. Memory channels are also down from 999 to 200, and the backlighting on the keys are gone.

Many may not like that the easy to use hardware squelch as well as VFO (tuning) knobs have gone. The reviewer makes the point that this could be easier now for single-handed operation though.

But on balance it is probably better than the older model if I had to choose between the two.

See... Show more...
 

My new Yaesu FT-991A HF/VHF/UHF All Mode Transceiver arrived today


I've really struggled to get the bits and pieces together but finally today I got the UHF connectors for the coax and the radio itself arrived too. Took a good hour plus to get the connectors all soldered on and connect the wires to the 30Amp DC power supply and finally I got to switch it on. It all powered up OK but I was initially not receiving anything with the balun connected between the radio and the HF antenna (a G5RV Junior antenna for my roof). So I removed the balun and it seems to be receiving fine now (I can't transmit until I get my license in May 2019 so it's not too serious right now and I can spend time diagnosing the antenna - may be a bad solder joint).

For now it's going to be listening and getting used to tuning the radio. I need to mount the antenna in the roof this coming weekend, and still get a VHF/UHF antenna. The aim is to next year start DX'ing far afield. The radio will output 100W on HF but I can see why so much time gets spent discussing and diagnosing antennas... the ra... Show more...
 
Image/photo
My new Yaesu FT-991A HF/VHF/UHF All Mode Transceiver arrived today

I've really struggled to get the bits and pieces together but finally today I got the UHF connectors for the coax and the radio itself arrived too. Took a good hour plus to get the connectors all soldered on and connect the wires to the 30Amp DC power supply and finally I got to switch it on. It all powered up OK but I was initially not receiving anything with the balun connected between the radio and the HF antenna (a G5RV Junior antenna for my roof). So I removed the balun and it seems to be receiving fine now (I can't transmit until I get my license in May 2019 so it's not too serious right now and I can spend time diagnosing the antenna - may be a bad solder joint).

For now, it's going to be listening and getting used to tuning the radio. I need to mount the antenna in the roof this coming weekend, and still get a VHF/UHF antenna. The aim is t... Show more...
 
\https://plus.google.com/+DanievanderMerwe/posts/gKqw81LwBuT

My new Yaesu FT-991A HF/VHF/UHF All Mode Transceiver arrived today

I've really struggled to get the bits and pieces together but finally today I got the UHF connectors for the coax and the radio itself arrived too. Took a good hour plus to get the connectors all soldered on and connect the wires to the 30Amp DC power supply and finally I got to switch it on. It all powered up OK but I was initially not receiving anything with the balun connected between the radio and the HF antenna (a G5RV Junior antenna for my roof). So I removed the balun and it seems to be receiving fine now (I can't transmit until I get my license in May 2019 so it's not too serious right now and I can spend time diagnosing the antenna - may be a bad solder joint).

For now it's going to be listening and getting used to tuning the radio. I need to mount the antenna in the roof this coming weekend, and still get a VHF/UHF antenna... Show more...
 

Amateur radio operator provides aid from a great distance - Never underestimate the potential of volunteerism


Amateur radio operator Fred Moore recently assisted the United States Coast Guard with an on-the-water rescue of a mariner suffering chest pains in the Atlantic Ocean.

Society does not only depend on paid emergency workers or law enforcement etc. Volunteers are a vital supplement to these paid services for two reasons: Firstly they are not paid to do it as a job and have a genuine desire to help, and Secondly because they often have a specific skill or experience that they are good at.

Although such volunteers often organise themselves into teams/clubs that operate over an extended period it is true that volunteers can't be held legally liable to prove a 24/7 service for 365 days of the year but this is why also they do not replace existing agencies or services - they serve a complementary function and often fill niches (like the example case here) where normal services do not extend to.

Many years ago when I was a serving police officer I rem... Show more...
 
Amateur radio operator provides aid from a great distance - Never underestimate the potential of volunteerism

Amateur radio operator Fred Moore recently assisted the United States Coast Guard with an on-the-water rescue of a mariner suffering chest pains in the Atlantic Ocean.

Society does not only depend on paid emergency workers or law enforcement etc. Volunteers are a vital supplement to these paid services for two reasons: Firstly they are not paid to do it as a job and have a genuine desire to help, and Secondly because they often have a specific skill or experience that they are good at.

Although such volunteers often organise themselves into teams/clubs that operate over an extended period it is true that volunteers can't be held legally liable to prove a 24/7 service for 365 days of the year but this is why also they do not replace existing agencies or services - they serve a complementary function and often fill niches (like the example case here) where normal services do not extend to.

Many years ago when I was a serving police o... Show more...
 
\https://plus.google.com/+DanievanderMerwe/posts/aRLoA5rvTDJ

Amateur radio operator provides aid from a great distance - Never underestimate the potential of volunteerism

Amateur radio operator Fred Moore recently assisted the United States Coast Guard with an on-the-water rescue of a mariner suffering chest pains in the Atlantic Ocean.

Society does not only depend on paid emergency workers or law enforcement etc. Volunteers are a vital supplement to these paid services for two reasons: Firstly they are not paid to do it as a job and have a genuine desire to help, and Secondly because they often have a specific skill or experience that they are good at.

Although such volunteers often organise themselves into teams/clubs that operate over an extended period it is true that volunteers can't be held legally liable to prove a 24/7 service for 365 days of the year but this is why also they do not replace existing agencies or services - they serve a complem... Show more...
 
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